Arlington Local

Arlington Local


Things That Go Bump in the County

Center for Local History explores local folklore and hauntings.

Deep in the Arlington Center for Local History are a set of files.

Football, Friends, French: Getting Immersed in Arlington

Sharing in each other’s cultural perspectives.

There were three French girls at the Yorktown Homecoming game. The only problem was, they had no idea what was happening on the field

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Exchange with French Lycee Dispels Stereotypes

Broadening their education

When they had a reception/picnic at the Iwo Jima Memorial, the parents, teachers, and youths taking part in the exchange between Lycée Marc Chagall in Reims, France and the four Arlington high schools were at ease with each other.

Turkey Trot Kicks Off

Arlingtonians came out on the evening of Oct. 19 to register for the Arlington Turkey Trot.

Arlington Man Pleads Guilty to Robbing Two Alexandria Banks

On October 20, 2016, Budder Khan, a 26-year-old resident of Arlington, pleaded guilty to two counts of Bank Robbery.

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Making STEM Fun for Children

Event offered opportunity to learn about STEM subjects.

A local educator used carrots and broccoli to teach girls about science and technology.

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Inbound Traffic

Looming noise mitigation and traffic overflow concerns haunt I-395 project.

The I-395 extension is here. As the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT) gets closer to the project’s start in spring, 2017, outreach has started to the affected communities near the road and to the County Board.

Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness Supports Meals Tax

After careful consideration, the Fairfax – Falls Church Partnership to Prevent and End Homelessness has decided to fully support the proposed 4 percent Fairfax County Meals Tax.

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American Elections: French Perspective

I am a French student who chose to come to study close to Washington DC for what I thought would be one of the most interesting elections in the history of Uncle Sam’s country.

Column: No to the Meals Tax

A food tax is not a silver bullet.

I have been opposed to the meals tax from the start, but what has concerned me most over the last several months has been the tactics used to try to convince our residents to vote for it and the county’s failure to deal with its spending problems. I would like to offer some clarity on these points and why I am against the meals tax.

Vote Yes: Immigrant Families Rely on Schools for More Than Education

Fairfax County Public Schools are more than just a place to learn. Growing up in Burke, I saw firsthand how our schools created a sense of community and neighborhood camaraderie. Schools are where we could go to borrow a book, where we could watch and play sports, and where we could perform a play or listen to a concert.

Column: Yes to the Meals Tax

Reduces dependence on property tax.

As a businessman here in Fairfax and a former member of the Fairfax County School Board, I write on behalf of a coalition of thousands of homeowners, parents, teachers, firefighters, police, friends and users of our libraries and our parks and recreation facilities, and those who belong to churches and non-profit organizations working to ensure that Fairfax County also protects those in need [].

Letter: Supporting Meals Tax

Letter to the Editor

I’m writing to encourage Fairfax County voters to support the county meals tax referendum on the ballot in November.

Letter: Meals Tax: A Better Option

Letter to the Editor

After reviewing Fairfax County’s proposed 4-percent meals tax, the Class Size Counts (CSC) board voted to support the Nov. 8 referendum because it decided that it would be better to raise money for Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) through a tax on prepared foods rather than through additional increases to County property taxes.

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Arlington: The Unconventional Race

8th District election pits Beyer against Hernick.

While the nation chooses between two Presidential candidates of extreme political and temperamental differences, voters in Virginia’s 8th District face a different kind of decision. As Democratic U.S. Rep. Don Beyer runs for reelection, he faces opposition from an un-Trump-like Republican candidate. Republican candidate Charles Hernick meets at Commonwealth Joe’s, a coffee shop in Pentagon City so new it hasn’t even had its official opening. It’s populated almost exclusively by millennials, and Hernick fits right in. When asked about the political issues that matter to them, the students and baristas at Commonwealth Joe’s all answer that climate change and combating student debt are their key voting issues. It’s a liberal atmosphere, but that doesn’t stop Hernick from trying to win them over.